Weekly e-Pistle – Sept. 25, 2013

Thoughts from Lori+

Just a couple of reminders for your calendar about two upcoming events: the Blessing of the Animals and the Living Compass Mini-retreat. The Blessing of the Animals will be Sunday afternoon, October 6th, at 4pm, rain or shine. Everyone, including friends and neighbors, is invited. For safety and sanity, please bring your pets on leashes or carriers, whichever is most appropriate for your species. If your pet isn’t the traveling kind, feel free to bring a picture or some representation of your beloved furry, feathered, or scaly baby. There will also be an opportunity to give thanks for all the pets we have shared our lives with and who are now waiting for us at the Pearly Gates. In other words, if you’re an animal lover, this event is for you.

The Living Compass Mini-retreat will take place here at St. Paul’s on Saturday morning, October 12th, from 9am to noon. Living Compass is a foundation developed by the Rev. Scott Stoner and Holly Stoner for the purpose of promoting health and wellness in churches, families, and individuals. (Of special note to us is the fact that Scott is the brother of our own Beth Lukas.) The retreat will be an opportunity to have fun, be inspired, and learn about ancient, holistic approaches to wellness. You’ll leave with your own personal wellness “map” and feeling renewed and reenergized. This event is for everyone. Feel free to invite anyone you think would benefit from this experience.

And as long as the subject is our calendars, remember our two new ongoing opportunities for fellowship: Women’s Wednesday will be October 2nd at 7pm here at the church, and the Men’s Breakfast will be Saturday, October 5th from 8 to 10am at Kim & Patty’s.

All this is being offered for your spiritual benefit! We hope to see you at any or all of these events. God bless.

Faithfully,

Lori_Sig

29th Annual Lobster Fest

Saturday, October 5th

TOP FOUR REASONS TO ORDER A LOBSTER:

1. The lobsters are flown in fresh that morning.

2. You don’t have a pan big enough? No need to worry, lobster are available live or cooked!

3. Isn’t it a lot of work to remove the meat from a lobster? It is easier than you think!!! Watch this video to see how easy it is: http://lifehacker.com/the-best-way-to-get-all-the-meat-out-of-a-lobster-483432288

4. Last be not least: NO NEED TO DRIVE TO WOODSTOCK… LOBSTERS WILL BE DELIVERED TO ST. PAUL’S ON OCTOBER 5TH. (More details to come)

So visit www.lobsterchurch.org to order your lobster today!!!

Deadline: NOON on Tuesday, October 1st.

Blessing of the Animals

Blessing of the Animals

October 6, 2013 4PM

On the grounds of:

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
3706 W. St. Paul Avenue
McHenry

Everyone and all pets are most welcome!

Leashes and/or crates please!

Mini-Retreat

Living Compass Logo

October 12, 2013

9 AM TO NOON at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

Have fun, be inspired, learn ancient, holistic approach to wellness, and leave with a personal “wellness” map.

Lessons and Hymns

by the Rev. William P. McLemore

THE SCRIPTURE LESSONS:

Theme – “Wealth doesn’t build faith in God.”

The First Reading: Jeremiah 32:1-3a, 6-15

The prophet Jeremiah, at the word of the Lord, buys a field in Anathoth which God uses as a symbol that the fields and vineyards of Israel will prosper.

The Epistle: I Timothy 6:6-19

The writer calls for Timothy to shun the enticement of wealth and pursue, “righteousness, godliness, faith, love, endurance, and gentleness.”

The Gospel: Luke 16:1-13

Jesus offers another parable about a rich man who dies along with a poor man who had begged at his door. The poor man in God’s kingdom is with Abraham and the rich man is tormented in Hades. God doesn’t have much mercy on the rich man who then asks that his brother’s be warned.

THE HYMNS:

PROCESSIONAL HYMN: No. 375

“Give Praise and Glory.”

Fully German in composition and tune, it was written by Johann Jacob Schutz for his 1675 “Christliches Gedenkbuchlein” (Christian Hymnbook). The essential message of Jesus is found in the refrain of this hymn, “To God be praise and glory.” Wealth and power and no real substitute for true faith in God. The tune has the feel of a Bach composition but was composed by Peter Sohren who was born in Elbing, West Prussia, around 1630.

THE SEQUENCE HYMN

No. 574. “Before Thy Throne.”

The author of this hymn is William Boyd Carpenter (1841-1918), the Anglican Bishop of Ripon in North Yorkshire, England. This forms a dramatic poem seeking forgiveness and reconciliation along with personal spiritual growth. “For lives bereft of purpose high, forgive. forgive, O Lord, we cry.” The tune, “St. Petersburg,” was composed by Dimitri S. Borniniansky (1751-1825) and traces its roots to an old Russian

PRESENTATION HYMN: No. 705

“As Those of Old Their First Fruits Brought.”

This hymn was written by Frank Von Christierson (1900-1996), a Presbyterian minister who served a number of congregations in California. He is responsible for many popular hymns owned by the Hymn Society of America which holds the 1961 Copyright to this one. Born in Lovisa, Finland, he migrated to the United States and graduated from Stanford University and San Francisco Theological Seminary. In recognition of his activities as a hymn writer, von Christierson was named a “Fellow of the Hymn Society” in 1982. The hymn emphasizes bringing the fruits of our wealth to God. The tune, “Forest Green,” is an English melody adapted and harmonized by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958).

COMMUNION HYMN: No. 301

“Bread of the World.”

This hymn is one of many written by Reginald Heber (1793-1826), an Anglican priest who was named Bishop of Calcutta, India, in 1823, having spiritual responsibility for the English in all of India, until his sudden death from apoplexy, April 3, 1826. We have already sung about a half dozen of his hymns at St. Paul’s. The tune, “Rendez a Dieu,” is attributed to the 16th century composer, Louis Bourgeois . hymn.

RECESSIONAL HYMN: No. 625

“Ye Holy Angels Bright.”

Coventry CathedralThis is a composition of the Rev. Richard Baxter (1615-1691) a fiery Anglican priest who was very independent in thought and action. He challenged Oliver Cromwell for declaring himself the “Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland, which, among other things, netted him a two-year prison sentence. He died December 8, 1691 at the age of 76. This hymn was sung at the consecration of the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral from the German bombing destruction of the earlier edifice [see attached photograph]. The words reflect the triumph of faith over evil: “Let all thy days till life shall end, whate’er he send, be filled with praise.” The tune, “Darwall,” was composed by and named after John Darwall to be used singing Psalm 148. It is majestic and beautiful, especially when the last verse is accompanied by the soprano descant.

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101 Reasons to be Episcopal

Reason 54

Tired of hell fire and brimstone? Try incense.

Louie Crew
Diocese of Newark